Bridging The Gap 

As children turn 3 or 4, New York City parents often start considering the possibility of moving to the suburbs. After all, raising children here is not for the faint of heart. Living in New York City offers our children a myriad of rich cultural experiences and exposes them to a melting pot of ethnic diversity. But at what expense? In this sprawling metropolis, it’s virtually impossible to shelter our kids from the poverty, profanity-laced conversations and vulgar displays of human indecency found on the city sidewalks. Eager to ditch the concrete jungle for backyards and barbecues, thousands of Manhattan families every year partake in a mass exodus to the suburbs of Long Island, Westchester and New Jersey. But that leaves us, the courageous leftovers, addicted to the urban hustle and determined to raise well-adjusted, resilient kids in the world’s very best city.

Wouldn’t life be easier if we could open our back door and let our children spill out into the yard? Absolutely! But with Central Park only a few short blocks away and a multitude of iconic New York attractions at our fingertips, city kids are exposed to an exhilarating, diverse environment that challenges their curiosities and nurtures their desire to know more about their world. Sure, my kids may not have 3,000 square feet to stash the toys they seldom use, but after nap on any given day they will experience the thrills of riding the tram to Roosevelt Island, playing peek-a-boo with the animals in the Central Park Zoo, or studying the colossal dinosaurs at the Museum of Natural History.  Although at times it would be nice to have a bit more space, I feel so very privileged to offer my kids these unique adventures.

Whenever we have the opportunity, we strive to engage in quintessential New York City experiences and have amassed quite a bucket list of Big Apple essentials. Last weekend we capitalized on the unseasonably warm conditions and embarked on an expedition by foot across the Brooklyn Bridge. The elegance of this beloved landmark of grandiose proportion is surpassed only by the breathtaking views of lower Manhattan, the Statue of Liberty, and Freedom Tower. While walking the promenade, I couldn’t help but marvel at the potpourri of both tourists and NYC dwellers – a veritable melting pot of ethnic and cultural diversity. It is my hope that continuous immersion in such a heterogeneous city will encourage my children to grow into compassionate adults who understand and respect similarities and differences amongst people in their communities.

Once across the bridge, we wandered through Brooklyn Bridge Park in Dumbo, where the kids galloped through the large lawns like wild stallions against a backdrop of the most magnificent Manhattan sky-line. And no trip across the bridge would be complete without a visit to Jane’s carousel, the majestic waterfront merry-go-round enclosed in a genuine glass jewel box. The exquisite attention to detail is as extraordinary as the panoramic view from within the ornate crystal enclosure. Horses painted with genuine gold leaf are adorned with custom bridles hand-painted by the same authorized agent who puts finishing touches on the finest Mercedes-Benz vehicles. As the blazing afternoon sun began to weaken, I watched as my son circled round and round, dipping and rising to the tune of life’s most simple melody. There he was – my little boy, riding off into the sunset – the city at his back and only the horizon ahead. Sometimes in life we need to take a step back to see the beauty of what’s right in front of us. It was in this moment I felt so overcome with gratitude for the opportunity to rediscover this awe-inspiring metropolis through the eyes of my children. You see, while we may not have the picture-perfect suburban home and private back yard surrounded by a white picket fence, what we have is far more valuable. We have New York – the “Big Apple,” “the city that never sleeps,’’ the “concrete jungle.” And here, anything is possible. 

b3bk0b08bb1bk2

Shop My Look

 

Vintage Havana shirt

Vintage Havana 3-Tier Ruffle Blouse – Sold Out (Similar Here)

shirt

Flying Monkey Dark Wash Cutoff Shorts

shorts

Prada Sunglasses

ac0974aac0ea0bfbcb852f3792a85028_best

 

10 thoughts on “Bridging The Gap 

  1. OMG, such an amazing skyline and precious family; wish I were there, fashionista mommy nonpareil. You must be so proud of your stunning tiny dolls. Looks like your kids have a blast!

    Like

  2. Really enjoyed reading this, what a wonderful insight into a lifestyle that is completely different to my own. Your descriptions and photographs are so vivid, I love them!

    Like

  3. I couldn’t agree more. Thanks for the reminder. At this age so easy to throw in the towel with school tuition or grouchy neighbors. I can’t wait to get to the Brooklyn bridge with my children soon. I love the many fun ideas you always share!

    Like

  4. I totally agree – the City for one or two kids is amazing. I recently went down to Dumbo with friends and I need to take my kids down there – such an amazing spot! I actually lived on Central Park West for 15 years and told people I had the world’s biggest front yard. It was that third kid that did me in so when they were 2,4 & 6 we left right over the bridge to suburbia and I’ve never looked back. I can be on a subway platform in 15 minutes should I feel the City itch and now I have my own driveway which is heaven. Cheaper gas and groceries is a bonus too. The City isn’t for everyone but I totally get it. As long as you can swing it there’s no reason to ever leave!
    XO
    http://www.lehoarder.com/

    Like

  5. I live outside of Boston and before having kids I always wanted to live in the city. Now that I have a child I can see why some parents would want to live outside the city. Being right outside the city is always a good thought.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s